Factsheets

Men of Color

2 April 2017 In Factsheets

Men of Color in Higher Education

The enrollment and graduation rates of men of color in higher education lag behind not only those of white male students but also those of women of color. In 2013, only 38% of African-American students, 43% of Latino students, 40% of Native American students and 48% of Asian and Pacific Islander students were men.

Enrollment

  • Between 1990 and 2013, there was a continued pattern of fewer men of color than women of color enrolling in undergraduate programs.
    • In 2011, African-American men comprised only 6% of all undergraduate students enrolled at institutions of higher education.
    • In 2013, 38% of African-American undergraduates, 40% of Native American undergraduates, 43% of Hispanic undergraduates and 48% of Asian and Pacific Islander (AAPI) undergraduates were men.
  • Community colleges serve as the primary pathway into public institutions of higher education for male students of color.
    • Federal data suggests that 72% of African-American and 72% of Latino male students begin their postsecondary education at community colleges.

Degree Attainment

  • Across racial/ethnic groups, male students earned a smaller share of undergraduate degrees and certificates than female students in 2012–2013. The exception to this trend is with AAPI students.
    • 35% of African-American male students completed bachelor’s degrees within six years, compared to 45% of African-American females.
    • 49% of Latino male students completed bachelor’s degrees within six years, compared to 55% of Latino females.
    • 37% of American Indian/Alaska Native male students completed bachelor’s degrees within six years, compared to 43% of American Indian/Alaska Native females.
    • 50% of AAPI male students completed bachelor’s degrees within six years, compared to 49% of AAPI females.
  • In 2013, the percentage of males aged 25 to 29 who had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher was 55% for AAPI students, 37% for whites, 17% for African-Americans and 13% for Latinos.

Sources

“Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2016.” U.S. Department of Education, August 2016.

“The Condition of Education.” U.S. Department of Education, May 2016.

“The Concentration of Poverty in American Schools.” The Atlantic, February 2016.

Updated April 2017

download-now-button-blue-png